thaliasbooks

Thalia @ Pictures in the Words

I'm Thalia! I run a book blog called Pictures in the Words and I hope to be an editor for YA fiction. I'm a GoodReads refugee!

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The Martian
Andy Weir
Progress: 31/369 pages
The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien
J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien, Humphrey Carpenter
Progress: 193/432 pages
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
J.K. Rowling
Progress: 43/766 pages
The Children of Húrin
J.R.R. Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien
Progress: 313/313 pages
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
J.K. Rowling
Progress: 70/636 pages
Never Eighteen
Megan Bostic
Progress: 200/200 pages

Semi-Charmed Life

Semi-Charmed Life - Nora Zelevansky Before we get started, my rating is, obviously, reflective of my own enjoyment from the book. However, I think this book is more suited towards adults, and I think if I was in the generation or age range to understand the billions of references thrown around in the course of this novel, I probably would have given it a four, or at least a three. My main frustration with the book was being unable to understand the Zelevansky was even talking about most of the time, as this book is a big name dropper, and all the references just weren’t from my generation, even though this is shelved as a young adult book. Shelved as an adult book, I think it would attract a larger audience.Anyway! Often, I found myself scratching my head. I had to read the first chapter a couple of times to fully grasp what was even happening, and I had to read fairly carefully to catch the goings-on of the characters in the book. There was much more description than actual dialogue, and the writing relied on those descriptions to fuel the dramatic flair of the story. And it definitely was dramatic! And aside from the constant name dropping, it was a fairly enjoyable novel, and I’ll be honest, I even liked the characters.A copy of this book was provided by the publisher for review.Read more?http://thaliasbooks.tumblr.com/post/28359609047/semi-charmed-life-review